Note: CDC has released an emergency update announcing that there will be a single ICD-10 code for COVID-19 as of April 1, much earlier than the annual ICD-10 updates in October as stated below. The announcement is here. All relevant IT systems should be prepared to update to this new code and staff should be trained to use it. This change will increase the reliability of diagnoses data as an important counterpoint to lab data (see our post above, “Lab Data is the Gold Standard.”

As developments over the past several days have made clear, monitoring and addressing the coronavirus effectively will require consistent documentation of cases as they emerge, and accurate sharing of this information across organizations and IT systems. To this end, the CDC’s National Center for Health Statistics has announced that it will implement a new ICD-10-CM diagnosis code for the 2019 Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19), effective with the next update on October 1. 

In the meantime, the CDC released interim guidance for the coding of encounters related to coronavirus. We recommend that you confirm that your ICD-10 code sets include the codes in this interim CDC guidance, and that you begin relevant staff training on documenting COVID-19 in accordance with these guidelines as soon as possible. Local public health authorities may issue further notices and requirements in the days ahead, so be on the lookout for those as well.

In addition to accurate public health reporting, accurate health information exchange among providers and labs will be critical for communities to stay ahead of COVID-19 through effective treatment of individuals, coordination across organizations, and population monitoring.

Coding scenarios covered in the CDC interim guidance include:

  • Pneumonia case confirmed as due to COVID-19
  • Acute bronchitis confirmed as due to COVID-19
  • A case with COVID-19 documented as being associated with a lower respiratory infection, not otherwise specified or an acute respiratory infection, not otherwise specified
  • Acute respiratory distress syndrome developed in conjunction with the COVID-19
  • Cases where there is a concern about a possible exposure to COVID-19, but this is ruled out after evaluation
  • Cases where there is actual exposure to someone who is confirmed to have COVID-19

Thanks to the courageous front-line health care and public health workforce responding to the virus, and to everyone else supporting them with the information, training, and tools necessary for them to succeed – for all of our benefit.

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